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inspiration-natty geo style!!

I hardly do any coverage of Paris Fashion Week here at Sea of Shoes, because I know most of you probably check that out at Style.com or The Fashion Spot for yourselves! Plus other bloggers give plenty of coverage to the cream of the crop!
It's so exciting waiting every morning for new pictures of the shows-is Ann Demeulemeester tomorrow? I don't even know!! Better check the schedule.
Well instead of the great stuff thats hot off the Paris catwalks….tonight I will offer up something a little different, to refresh your eyes maybe, in case you're tired of fashion week coverage.
I found the picture below when I was flipping thru old National Geographics in art class. So excited to find this picture!! Wow!! Had to cut it out and scan it.
It is of a Tibetan Nomad…from National Geographic Vol. 175, No. 6-June 1989

Steampunk

Incredible! I wish I had taken the whole article out, but it was really long. Amazing nomadic civilization but this guy's get-up is out of this world.
His glasses are so steampunk:
398087480_LvNax-L-1
via gizmodo
Il_430xN.56829683
Steampunkspex
also via gizmodo
…………………………
HAPPY PARIS FASHION WEEK EVERYBODY!
xx jane

Leave a Comment

93 Comments

  1. Cruz wrote:

    I know I’ve commented you tonight already, but thank you soo much for posting this! I’ve had an obsession with nomads lately and this is an amazing picture. Those glasses are soo rad! :)

    3.5.09 · Reply
  2. Wow, that is such a great picture! The patchwork jeans remind me of your own denim tastes. I love that you see the style and beauty in the most unexpected places- it’s such a breath of fresh air within a blogosphere that is often replete with stale inspiration. I wish that all of us had the courage and conviction to follow our own eyes and hearts, rather than simply follow the rest of the flock. :)

    3.5.09 · Reply
  3. love his spectacles, such a history behind those.. absolutely.
    Kisses JJ!
    SAREE
    http://redlipshotstuff.blogspot.com

    3.5.09 · Reply
  4. Elizabeth wrote:

    Those shoes are re-purposed perfectly! Totally and amazingly unexpected. I’m sure it was done for utilitarian purposes but I wish I were able to look at a pair of ratty old shoes and see that potential in them.

    3.5.09 · Reply
  5. lucille wrote:

    Well I love the patchwork jean too !

    3.5.09 · Reply
  6. he is so wonderful to look at — I want to hug him. Or lend him my shower (he IS quite dirty). But he looks nice without a shower too. But I wonder what he looks like clean. What a puzzle. :)

    3.6.09 · Reply
  7. Amber wrote:

    those glasses are so cool <3
    heart your blog girlie!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  8. O ma ga! I want those glasses!!!! theyre to die!!!!! I feel kinda bad for the little nomad guy though- he looks kinda sad :(
    DavidCasavant.net

    3.6.09 · Reply
  9. Devin wrote:

    He is horrifying. I think I see those nomads wandering outside my apartment in SF! I should take some shots and send to you :P Great photo… his shoes are pretty incredible!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  10. laras wrote:

    Wow it really is such an amazing picture! It’s akwardly supercool! Hahaha

    3.6.09 · Reply
  11. ceilidh wrote:

    So strange!!
    My sister and I had an obsession with this EXACT photo a few years ago.
    Nice to see it again!
    Thanks!
    -C

    3.6.09 · Reply
  12. marz wrote:

    absolutely amazing!!!!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  13. Georgie wrote:

    Incredible.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  14. Jen wrote:

    That’s such a striking picture.
    Really into what he’s got going on at his feet.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  15. love those shoes on him.
    http://momfashionworld.blogspot.com/

    3.6.09 · Reply
  16. McCall wrote:

    those glasses are amazing!!!! thanks for finding the photo of the nomadic guy!!
    xoxo, McCall

    3.6.09 · Reply
  17. wow very intriguing. i especially am fascinated by his shoes. he reminds me a lot of the sand people in star wars.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  18. Rachel wrote:

    Totally reminds me of that eyeball maker guy in Blade Runner, no?

    3.6.09 · Reply
  19. cassiopeia wrote:

    Great pic… I always love Nat Geo. The photography is so inspiring. Makes me want to break out of my little uni bubble and get out there ;-D
    the glasses are so odd, yet, really seductive. might put a similar pair on my antiquing-wish list ;-)
    Xxxc
    http://clothestohealabrokenheart.blogspot.com/

    3.6.09 · Reply
  20. Sasha wrote:

    Hi, I really love reading your site. That being said I was upset about this entry. Knowing what I do about the Tibetan people and their hardships and struggles, it’s a bit jarring to have you comment in such a blase manner about his attire. For him those glasses aren’t a fashion statement, they’re an essential tool to help him make a living. Tibet is a place of great tragedy and marginalization. It seems really insensitive and ignorant of you to commend him on his attire, when it most likely wasn’t by choice. What you are praising is the resourcefulness he has had to acquire because of China’s horrible treatment of Tibet and its people. I really hope in the future you will be more sensitive to the implications of your words.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  21. hannah wrote:

    there’s something about that photo that’s extremely sad. i’m sorry but i just can’t see beyond the man’s realistic conditions to discover the the glitz of his spectacles.
    just my 2 cents

    3.6.09 · Reply
  22. Sabrina wrote:

    Neat! I bought my boyfriend this photography book about different pilgrimages from around the world, and one section featured some Tibetans dressed up in similar attire. I was thinking about scanning it months ago and then never did. I like the tattered cloths and patchwork boots made from what looks like Chucks!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  23. helen wrote:

    have to agree with sasha and hannah. i was in tibet a few years ago, and when you’re actually in that situation its hard to simply admire his ‘costume’ without first being empathetic with his situation. and my fellow readers, “dirty”? it’s sad to read comments like that when we live in such an extremely priviliged world.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  24. Sabrina wrote:

    Oh and realizing that my last post probably wouldn’t swing over well with some people, I’d just like to add that you can choose see tragedy everywhere or you can choose to see life as a whole. If we’re talking tragedy, I think Western culture, with it various substance abuse problems, full bellies but undernourished bodies, and increasing rates of depression, is equally tragic. You never know, underneath that weathered old skin could be a man sublimely happy and accepting of his condition. In that case he’s better off then the rest of us miserable fools who can’t even be happy living in the lap of luxury. Just a thought.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  25. Jane wrote:

    The Ann show is tomorrow at 430! :)

    3.6.09 · Reply
  26. Emily Rose wrote:

    You should really check out the movie “Wheel of Time” directed by Werner Herzog… You’ve probly heard of him / seen it, but if you haven’t, I recommend you netflix Herzog immediately. He’s incredible, and the picture of that tibetan nomad really reminds me of the people you see in his documentaries. “Fata Morgana” by herzog is crazy, too.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  27. Jill wrote:

    This is why you should always use Sunscreen!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  28. Liz wrote:

    Oh my gosh, really really cool nomadic tribe. anyway, check out those steampunk glasses!
    As an international politics/relations kinda gal, as well as a fashionista, seriously, OUCH. Reading that part made me wince.
    “Oh and realizing that my last post probably wouldn’t swing over well with some people, I’d just like to add that you can choose see tragedy everywhere or you can choose to see life as a whole. If we’re talking tragedy, I think Western culture, with it various substance abuse problems, full bellies but undernourished bodies, and increasing rates of depression, is equally tragic. You never know, underneath that weathered old skin could be a man sublimely happy and accepting of his condition. In that case he’s better off then the rest of us miserable fools who can’t even be happy living in the lap of luxury. Just a thought.”
    Fine then it would make sense talk about how happy he is or about, you know, his tribe or living situation, not about his awesome get-up and steampunk glasses.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  29. hoyan wrote:

    wow, i remember that picture from art-class collage-making a couple of years back! actually i have it saved in my paper files somewhere too- the shoes on that nomad are amazing.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  30. Margarita wrote:

    The shoes are amazing!
    You are my featured blog this week Jane!
    http://fab.typepad.com

    3.6.09 · Reply
  31. Ariel wrote:

    wow people chill out its a fashion blog. what is wrong with seeing something you like in a photograph — every moment in life doesn’t have to be deep and heavy.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  32. Sasha wrote:

    “Oh and realizing that my last post probably wouldn’t swing over well with some people, I’d just like to add that you can choose see tragedy everywhere or you can choose to see life as a whole. If we’re talking tragedy, I think Western culture, with it various substance abuse problems, full bellies but undernourished bodies, and increasing rates of depression, is equally tragic. You never know, underneath that weathered old skin could be a man sublimely happy and accepting of his condition. In that case he’s better off then the rest of us miserable fools who can’t even be happy living in the lap of luxury. Just a thought.”
    For most Tibetans, life as a whole includes the denial of basic human rights like the right to housing, health care and education as well as freedom of speech, assembly, movement and travel. Tragedy can be found everywhere, this is true, but I don’t think you can compare the challenges and hardships that this man and his people have to face to the problems of Western culture. These problems were imposed by the Chinese government while many of the problems Westerners face are self-imposed. Westerners might suffer from a lack of spiritual fulfillment, but many Tibetans suffer from a lack of basics goods and services necessary for life.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  33. Lauren wrote:

    Hey Jane, I was just wondering if you got your license yet and what type of car you’re getting.
    Also, I noticed some people are upset because of the Tibetan in your picture. It reminds me of the time Erin Wasson was commending homeless people for their style. Don’t worry, your comments about the man were not nearly as brainless and offensive as Erin’s were. I think the post is fine but I understand why some people are upset.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  34. Sabrina wrote:

    It all boils down to whether you think suffering from the lack of basic necessities is or is not worse than suffering from spiritual deprivation. It’s a bit subjective.
    Anyways… sorry for opening this can of worms on your blog Jane!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  35. Ane wrote:

    I really like your blog, but don’t tell me that you just thought about his outfit first, please.
    didn’t you think about the poverty or something else first?
    I know this is a fashion blog, but as you said you were offering something different. didn’t you think that this man have made that pants that way because he couldn’t afford a pair and had to do it with pieces of retails?
    I insist I like your blog, but you should take these things into account

    3.6.09 · Reply
  36. V wrote:

    National Geographic has by far the most inspiring and gorgeous photos….
    love :)
    radicalproper.blogspot.com

    3.6.09 · Reply
  37. amber wrote:

    I am a little disappointed. The idea of you flipping through a national geographic and being wowed by this gentleman’s fashion tells me just how far removed we as a generation have become.
    I find it hard to believe that this man’s “get-up” is anything close to a fashion statement. His pants are likely patchwork because that is all he had available to him. He and his country’s destitution is supposed to be our “inspiration” and “rest for our eyes”?! ARE YOU KIDDING ME?!
    I like your blog- and for the most part, I like what you have to say. But this is a low point in your blog history.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  38. Good grief, those glasses are fabulous!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  39. deltay wrote:

    Those are definitely some kickin’ glasses!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  40. Nat wrote:

    I like your blog, but please have a little sensitivity. This is reminiscent of Erin Wasson’s comment about the homeless having such great fashion.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  41. Johanna wrote:

    Love your blog!!!
    Follow the swedish lawstudents blogwar on
    http://claudiojohnno.blogspot.com/
    Best wishes from Stockholm!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  42. leyla m. wrote:

    im in paris right now and with all the stiffness and rudeness, this picture just made my day!
    LM
    http://avisionofneon.blogspot.com/

    3.6.09 · Reply
  43. ohphilippa wrote:

    his patchwork legwarmers are pretty fantastic too!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  44. drollgirl wrote:

    love those glasses/googles!!!!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  45. Luna wrote:

    those shoes ARE pretty fab.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  46. tartandtreacly wrote:

    “It all boils down to whether you think suffering from the lack of basic necessities is or is not worse than suffering from spiritual deprivation. It’s a bit subjective.”
    Yes, who indeed will think of all those spiritually-deprived, over-privileged, solipsistic First World kids who bleat on about the “subjectivity” of suffering on the internet, even in the face of the irrefutable fact of the average Tibetan’s lack of both material and spiritual freedom.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  47. Gabrielle Papa wrote:

    I agree with most here, that this is in poor taste ala Erin Wasson, but not as bad, but everyone else has basically said it all. Poverty, oppression, basic human rights and the lot.
    But I think it’s a sin you cut up such an old National Geographic! You could have scanned it fine with the magazine in tact. Such a shame. If I find old magazines I try to preserve them, it’s always interesting to read an article written in a different time, even if it was only 20 years ago.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  48. i saw that picture and instantly thought ‘mad max’ but i think you’re right, he’s way more steam punk.
    i love the fact that he’s adapted a pair of converse into a pair of crazy nomad stylee boots!

    3.6.09 · Reply
  49. Kelsey wrote:

    That is the raddest, most random inspiration ever.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  50. lily wrote:

    i think that the beauty of fashion is being able to find inspiration in anything, including subjects that may not exactly be “happy.” Jean Pierre Braganza’s line was inspired by the destruction of Native American culture by Westernization – he managed to turn a terrible loss into a wonderful fashion line. All that matters is self-awareness, in my opinion.
    and i’m sorry to be giving you all a history lesson, but all you preachers need to do some research before spouting sanctimonious stuff – being self-righteous doesn’t necessarily make you always right! don’t blame the chinese government for “imposing” poverty on the tibetans. it was actually the chinese government that introduced electricity, built schools, built roads, and brought all sorts of modern developments into tibetan life. without them, tibetans would still be living under a serf-based economy where torture and brutal beheadings and hangings were accepted forms of punishment for crimes. it’s true that the tibetans lack freedoms, but it is ignorant and oversimplified to blame them for ruining tibetan life. some western bandwagon protesters will never be able to understand the complexities of asian politics.

    3.6.09 · Reply
  51. Emily wrote:

    Yep, this is as terrible as Erin Wasson’s comment
    now go back to your private school, your designer clothing, and your mcmansion and your privileged little world not at all realizing how what you said is wrong and vulgar.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  52. k wrote:

    GEEEEEEEEEEEZZZZZZZZEEEEEEEEEEEEEE

    3.7.09 · Reply
  53. b-chic wrote:

    I apologize in advance for the lack of my English, I will try to express my thoughts without being too ridiculous, I hope….This is a blog that talks about fashion, about colors, shapes, sensations or emotions that a picture or an object can cause. If you want to talk about sociology, politics, religion, human rights, this is not the right blog, you have to go on the blog of Amnesty International or Green Peace

    3.7.09 · Reply
  54. Lauren wrote:

    hahaha, you just made me love your blog even more! thank you for not posting fashion coverage like everyone else. you’re awesome.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  55. helen wrote:

    really? western bandwagon protesters? i know how it is, i was in tibet, i’m a chinese citizen who lived in the next closest big city to tibet. if anything i do understand how it is for tibetans, both from the side of the chinese government and from them. bandwagon? i think not.
    but anyway, irrelevant. i think what peeved us about jane’s post was the fact that it was so casually noted how “fab” this nomad’s outfit is without relating some information of how/why it came to be that way. a little insensitive.
    yes people find inspiration everywhere, but they decide to understand the site before they truly feel inspired.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  56. Elle wrote:

    I don’t thing there’s anything wrong in garnering inspiration from the textures, colours, etc. of a photograph. But it is definitely not appropriate to use that photo solely as fashion inspiration, without acknowledging the deprivation and suffering it portrays.
    And whichever side of the Tibet/China political debate you embrace, it is absolutely reprehensible to ignore the sheer amount of individual suffering going on in that part of the world.
    You like what he’s wearing in the photo? Fine – but don’t make it only about his outfit; to do that is an insult to photo, and to the conditions and unfortunate circumstances which the photo portrays.
    “It all boils down to whether you think suffering from the lack of basic necessities is or is not worse than suffering from spiritual deprivation. It’s a bit subjective.”
    … Um, no. Everyone who is participating in this discussion obviously has access to a computer and, I’m going to bet, leads the kind of privileged life where technology, education, free speech and intact human rights are the norm. Yes, the West has its mountains of issues — but to say that the problems of our culture are equally as damaging as having to live in abject poverty, without access to clean water, food, without the basic human rights which we have been raised to take for granted — that is absolutely outrageous.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  57. fogo wrote:

    i think it’s really pretentious of all of you that are making those bad human rights comments… for posting a pic that came from nat geo? oh come on.. please get off your high horses, people get inspired by all kinds of things all the time.. (HINT HINT.that doesn’t mean you’re making fun of them, as some of you might like to think)
    So, according to the analysis of these “bright” people, whoever makes tattered designs is doing the same thing! gucci last year did this whole russian gypsie theme! for shame! they should know better and check the average net worth of their insiprations before marketing a whole collection inspired by them! oh the travesty!
    what a bunch of fools..
    *on another note*
    the glasses remind me of dr. frankenstein.. creepy..

    3.7.09 · Reply
  58. mara wrote:

    you are perfect

    3.7.09 · Reply
  59. katie. wrote:

    brilliant, jane :)
    my gosh. i like his glasses. but his shoes are pretty neat too.
    thanks for posting.
    yay fashion week!
    Im checking in everyday. dont stop!

    3.7.09 · Reply
  60. joanna wrote:

    this was really tasteless, jane.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  61. Daniela wrote:

    lol i dont know why but he reminds me of robin williams!

    3.7.09 · Reply
  62. Brittany wrote:

    I don’t see why you can’t discuss fashion just because you take a ‘higher than thou’ attitude towards someone in a different situation.
    Someone hit the nail on the head- Self righteousness it is. And THAT is unattractive.
    Sabrina and lily… think you both pinned this one well :)

    3.7.09 · Reply
  63. tartandtreacly wrote:

    “i think that the beauty of fashion is being able to find inspiration in anything, including subjects that may not exactly be “happy.” Jean Pierre Braganza’s line was inspired by the destruction of Native American culture by Westernization – he managed to turn a terrible loss into a wonderful fashion line. All that matters is self-awareness, in my opinion. ”
    Self-awareness and sensitivity, neither of which Jane nor some commenters here exhibited.
    “and i’m sorry to be giving you all a history lesson, but all you preachers need to do some research before spouting sanctimonious stuff – being self-righteous doesn’t necessarily make you always right! don’t blame the chinese government for “imposing” poverty on the tibetans. it was actually the chinese government that introduced electricity, built schools, built roads, and brought all sorts of modern developments into tibetan life. without them, tibetans would still be living under a serf-based economy where torture and brutal beheadings and hangings were accepted forms of punishment for crimes. it’s true that the tibetans lack freedoms, but it is ignorant and oversimplified to blame them for ruining tibetan life. some western bandwagon protesters will never be able to understand the complexities of asian politics.”
    Oh no, certainly not like some China-apologists can, what with their neo-imperialist rhetoric of economic determinism and moral equivocation.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  64. lily wrote:

    helen, i’m sorry if my hastily-written post offended you. i’ve gotten so used to people here in the U.S. saying things without knowing any history, so i’m a little too touchy when it comes to this subject. :P
    in regards to the post, i just feel that most of the critics of this post sound terribly harsh. when i was younger, there were a lot of worldly issues i wasn’t aware of at the time that i understand now (that makes me sound really old. i’m a college student, i swear). there are ways to make people understand your point without sounding like you’ve already reserved your space in the heavens due to your astounding knowledge and are talking down to the rest of us sheltered earth-crawlers.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  65. tamaki wrote:

    I. Want. His. Glasses. So precious!! Plus, they’re a bit of history.

    3.7.09 · Reply
  66. Liz wrote:

    “in regards to the post, i just feel that most of the critics of this post sound terribly harsh. when i was younger, there were a lot of worldly issues i wasn’t aware of at the time that i understand now (that makes me sound really old. i’m a college student, i swear). there are ways to make people understand your point without sounding like you’ve already reserved your space in the heavens due to your astounding knowledge and are talking down to the rest of us sheltered earth-crawlers. ”
    Well, this is the thing. It has nothing to do with having godly, untouchable knowledge and bragging about it. The picture was from an ARTICLE of National Geographic. I haven’t read that issue, but I’d like to bet that it PROBABLY wasn’t entitled “Tibetan Fashion” or “Check out the dude’s glasses”. I’m guessing Jane skimmed over it or read it, so I’m sure that some information about the nomads and their lives was right there below the picture. THAT almost makes it worse than if she had seen the picture in a photography museum with no context, and thought fashion-first!

    3.7.09 · Reply
  67. h wrote:

    Please! If Jane has done anything it’s inspired sensitivity and awareness towards Tibet simply by posting this picture.
    She certainly has not degraded the subject. And there is nothing wrong with pulling inspiration from the garb of indigenous people in impoverished countries. While they have larger concerns, they are still human. I’m sure they’d take it as a compliment!

    3.7.09 · Reply
  68. nami0706 wrote:

    Hi Jane!I see your blog from Japan!
    I knew here in ‘teen vogue’March,US version.(I can buy it large bool store)
    Your style is pretty and have different attraction of Japanese fashion!
    See me cool fashion next time!

    3.7.09 · Reply
  69. Lala wrote:

    It’s nice to see beauty in places you’d least think of.
    Nomads always have great stories to tell.
    to Lily:
    “i’m sorry to be giving you all a history lesson, but all you preachers need to do some research before spouting sanctimonious stuff. ”
    I’m sorry because your “history lesson” or “research” is obviously very biased. I don’t think its fair for someone like you to make just bold statements because personally, I’ve been affected by the situation with Tibet.
    I would like to disagree with your rash statement that Tibetans would still be living under a serf-based economy where torture and brutal beheading and hangings were acceptable “without the Chinese”. It’s hard to not take it as an insult.
    I am a Tibetan and I am aware that, yes, such things happened in our history but it happened in other places too…(England for example). So just because it occurred long ago doesn’t give you any right to state that we’d still be doing it today.
    The state Tibet is in currently is pretty sad. I’ve been there myself and everyone lives in constant fear. There are Chinese spies sent by the government on the streets, we can’t even practice our religion freely and I couldn’t even talk openly with my own relatives (they said that it was dangerous to mention certain names, such as the Dalai Lama). It was really sad.
    I understand that, yes China has invaded our country and, obviously, no one likes to be invaded but the fact is that they have so many restrictions and don’t allow completely freedom for the Tibetans.
    Currently there are Tibetans living in India and we’ve accomplished a lot. There ARE schools, hospitals, businesses, religious temples…(etc) that we’ve set up so I don’t think it’s fair for you to say that we wouldn’t have all of that without the Chinese. You make us Tibetans sound like we’d be cave people living in the dark without the Chinese.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  70. Lala wrote:

    Oh and I’d like to add that, as a Tibetan, I’m not at all insulted by this photograph. (:

    3.8.09 · Reply
  71. glossie wrote:

    hmmm… i was about to ask if anyone wants to see pictures of tibetan fashion i took when i was there in 06…

    3.8.09 · Reply
  72. renata wrote:

    Weird. I was actually at my library yesterday and I swear I picked up that same issue (among others including May 1957 I believe with all the Mt. Everest Climbers)
    It was really wicked awesome and it’s cool that you posted it.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  73. yulanda wrote:

    http://www.cwru.edu/affil/tibet/booksAndPapers/Remote%20World%20of%20Tibet%27s%20Nomads.html
    After a quick Google search, I found the original article where the photo came from (it’s on the last page of the article). It’s an interesting read.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  74. Claudia. wrote:

    I absolutely agree, lily.
    As someone that grew up in the third world, I often find a little amusing the quick outrage towards any insinuation that people from poor countries might not actually be martyrs or go through life deprived of any thought that could denote satisfaction or even fun, it seems like some people want to believe that those in poor countries take life with the same harsh approach as those in the first world do.. as someone who’s now been to places like the US, I can safely say that people in places like Latin America or Asia have a much brighter perspective and easier route to happiness than those with more than basic needs covered.
    For those that truly see fashion as an outlet of creativity and inspiration with endless resources instead of the validation of a sought-after status that should be exclusively about money or trends, imagery like this, of men dressed by needs, lifestyle, location, completely indifference and even ‘tragedy’.. for someone that can see garments as a silent language of global society, pictures like this can be very strong and beautiful to look at. I’m talking for myself here, not necessarily for Jane as I don’t really know her, or follow this blog much for that matter!, but the way her appreciation for this picture was deviated into something ‘insensitive’ seems so off and why not say it, very superficial..
    I’d like to recommend here ‘Notebook on Cities & Clothes’, a late 80s documentary by Wim Wenders, about the creative process behind a Yohji Yamamoto collection, they touch this subject for several minutes, about men from the war, rural areas, past generations, etc, and the way their life or approach to it is projected through their clothing, it’s so interesting.. everyone that follows fashion actively or passively should watch it, that’s for me, the reason why the fashion industry is still blooming in creativity, because there are people who still see such a simple need as an expression and inspiration, not really because of that luxurious shelter for the insecure or money-hungry that’s been imposed and portrayed as our spokesperson.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  75. haley wrote:

    love his glasses!

    3.8.09 · Reply
  76. Liz wrote:

    Hey, thanks to whoever posted the entire article! Great read :)
    “I absolutely agree, lily.
    As someone that grew up in the third world, I often find a little amusing the quick outrage towards any insinuation that people from poor countries might not actually be martyrs or go through life deprived of any thought that could denote satisfaction or even fun, it seems like some people want to believe that those in poor countries take life with the same harsh approach as those in the first world do.. as someone who’s now been to places like the US, I can safely say that people in places like Latin America or Asia have a much brighter perspective and easier route to happiness than those with more than basic needs covered.”
    To continue the debate…..I don’t want to pull out the “6 degrees from the third world” card….but I am no stranger to it either. I have family in third world countries, as well as I’ve been to several poor countries for work or visiting relatives. I am FULLY aware that many people living in those countries are just as entranced with beautfy and fashion as we are, and look for ways to incorporate beauty into their (materially) sparse lives. I have many stories where that came from…where a girl so carefully maintained a dress that many of us would scoff at and put on the worst-dressed list- that was all she had, and she was so proud of it that it almost looked beautiful on her.
    I hope to anyone who studies or takes interests in these third world countries, that’s a “duh.” I am not someone who is prone to quick outrage, thank you very much. I was just so striking to see the “cool nomadic civilization- check out the glasses!” contrast in the entry. Actually, reading the article, the caption is pretty interesting. I’m not saying that she NEEDS to do this, but posting the caption and then talking about incorporating modern fashion into traditional fashion and inspiration….well, that would have made sense.
    As for this guy’s cool glasses, well, since that’s what he basically NEEDS to wear, due to his life and chronic eye problems, I think I’ll lay off talking about how awesome they are. Maybe I’m “too sensitive” about those things though. I’m sure that looking chic and steampunk is the last thing on his mind with those goggles.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  77. wendy broffman wrote:

    Yulanda’s post is worth reading. And for all you folks who responded to this blog aghast at what you call Jane’s insensitivity, do you personally ponder the plight of women who are REQUIRED to cover their bodies with cloth as you drool over the burka-inspired fashion that has paraded down the runways since the Muslim culture entered Western conciousness en mass after 9/11? I, for one, will be checking out the Wim Wenders documentary. I might learn something interesting.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  78. Sydnie wrote:

    Hi, Jane! I think that this picture is very inspiring, not only because it is a beautiful photo, but as it also gives us unsight on what it might have been like to be a Tibetan in those times. Don’t let anyone get you down, and I don’t believe you’ve been tasteless at all!
    If you have the time, I’d appreciate any feedback you could give me on my fashion blog, Take Me Out to the Runway. Here’s the link:
    http://www.takemeouttotherunway.blogspot.com
    Thanks, and good luck with your blog!
    * Sydnie

    3.8.09 · Reply
  79. Sydnie wrote:

    I didn’t mean to say “unsight” but rather “insight”. Sorry! :)

    3.8.09 · Reply
  80. britt wrote:

    I totally agree with Lily.
    part of human ingenuity is using what we have available. clothing is a perfect example.
    whether you are a punk kid who couldn’t afford to get new jeans and made do and added more tears to them in the 80s, or your a Tibetan nomad with patchwork, or your a South Indian who wears certain things for religious purposes….you can be inspiration to a kid with an imagination and the means to translate their clothing to art.
    so please leave the author alone.
    I’m sure there was no cruelty or callousness meant by this post.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  81. avery wrote:

    You should take the time to read teh article…Its makes being inspired about the picture worth while. Would you go to an museum and not read about the artist? You would never really know what you are looking at.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  82. andrea wrote:

    i just got to say that i love your blog, its very inspiring ;)

    3.8.09 · Reply
  83. mrs fluffington wrote:

    The first thing I thought of was the “Derelicte!” catwalk scene from Zoolander. Inspiration is everywhere, even if we sometimes have to overlook some not so pleasant realities to find it.

    3.8.09 · Reply
  84. Esmeralda Greenwich wrote:

    I LOVE YOUR WEBSITE!!!!!!!! you are soooooo amazing and i love that your fashion isn’t like every other teen’s. I saw the article in Teen Vogue about you, and I just had to look you up

    3.9.09 · Reply
  85. amazing photograph and evidence of the importance of protecting your skin from the sun to prevent ageing!
    {runs to put on sunscreen}

    3.10.09 · Reply
  86. This man is totally amazing, first of all I was thinking Jane is a little bit tired… but no the colors of his jacket and skirt a sort of very smart grey mixed with blue, and the legs ! his large legwarmers, I don’t know with open snickers waouhhh ! Really impress by this style. A tribute for this tibetan nomad.
    Thank you jane.

    3.10.09 · Reply
  87. alex wrote:

    steampunk,
    rules.

    3.10.09 · Reply
  88. TeaTime wrote:

    Jane is just a kid! She presents herself as an adult but let’s not forget she’s only 16 or 17. Who knew the history of Tibetan Nomads when they kids? She leads a privilaged life where the plight of Nomads really, if we are brutally honest, will be of no interest to her at all, certainly not to any important level. And unless she stops buying Givenchy shoes and gives the money to charity instead, then I suspect how ‘fab’ his glasses are will be the extent of her interest in this person and his situation.
    There are plenty adults, or people who are directly affected by the situation in Tibet, who do understand and are clearly, from these comments, better suited to give the matter the attention it deserves, but perhaps it’d be nice to let her be a child on her own blog.

    3.12.09 · Reply
  89. Jane Jiang wrote:

    dear jane,
    when I read this post, I immediately thought of a few things:
    1. you have a miraculous ability to see the beauty in the most mundane (or in this case, ‘exotic-mundane’),
    2. huzzah for the glory that is National Geographic. That was definitely my childhood right there. :)
    3. Tibetans = commenters are probably going to yell at you. And to my disappointment, that is indeed the case. I can’t apologize for the crassness of others, but let me try…. Anyone who reads your post with an artist’s eye (as well as a humanitarian’s) will see that you specifically made -no comment- about the circumstances of his life and politics, although I imagine such topics were largely what the article was about, wasn’t it? (How’s that for context, all you critics out there yelling about history and politics?)
    Speaking as an East Asian Studies student who’s deeply interested in (and somewhat sympathetic to, though less virulently and naively anti-governmentally so) rights politics and the Tibetan situation, I want to point out that there’s something inherently presumptuous about judging the plight of others without knowledge of what’s really going on–historically, socially. I sort of wish I could send an admonishing letter to all these ridiculously condemning kids, most of whose comments betray only the most superficial of understanding (if any at all) about what has been going on–for the past three centuries. These days, putting “Tibetan” in any context other than “suffering oppression injustice misery” seems an immediate cause for outrage. How is this -any- less brainwashed than what we accuse Middle Eastern theocracies of being?
    4. (this is important) All you ‘Tibetan survivalism isn’t art/beauty’ haters out there–that patchwork on his boots? That’s effing -art-, kids. You don’t make pretty patchwork patterns when you’re doing maximum efficiency. Someone put thought into that thing, which is damn well enough art for me. Denying the creativity and intentionality of those boots–that’s the real arrogance here, as if people with harder lives than we just can’t be creative.
    -another jane

    3.12.09 · Reply
  90. Violeta wrote:

    I love your style. but this just made my stomach turn. You have great clothes, but this is just to much. Coming from a “3rd world country” such as Colobmia, I take this things seriously. For me this is like seing all the people in my city that are living in the streets because they been avicted by violence from their homes, and some one taking a pics and saying, wow they have great style. I know this is a fashion blog, but I dont thibk that it gives the liberty to say such shallow things. So many people read your blog that I just hope this just gives you a wake up call, since everyone who has said they dont agree with your comment have been so polite, and they all seem to say it from the heart.

    3.13.09 · Reply
  91. sofia wrote:

    Jane JIANG, how can you assume all commenters are Tibetan? What a sickeningly prejudiced assumption. Your comment was by far the most crass of all, speak for yourself and don’t apologize for others.

    3.15.09 · Reply
  92. A problem? – I worry about the charming chef’s tobacco addiction – he should live a long life – he’s does good stuff, but at the rate he puffing them down, who knows?

    8.27.10 · Reply
  93. One of the reasons I admire Thatcher is because she was clever, curious and well-informed. I think you need to get over your class analysis of this situation. I also think the idea of a conservative who has no time for the concept of the ‘better’ is a contradiction of terms.

    10.12.10 · Reply